Sunday, 2 February 2014

Wet, Wet and Wet.


 In fact more like sodden beyond recognition, this was my conclusion of the Britford stretch of the River Avon, the target was to catch my first ever Grayling, one of any size would have been great, a total success but we were met in Salisbury by a raging torrent, 3 foot of extra water and it had dropped 8inches from two days before, "oh damn", I thought.

Dawn at the Salisbury Avon.

The three musketeers, Myself, Brian and Richy.

 Joined by Brian and my younger brother Richard we were all very confident in catching a Grayling, buoyed by the history of the fishery for what it provides we thought we couldn't go wrong, well we couldn't be anymore wrong, the old river is where the Grayling shoal up but that was totally unfishable due to the ridiculous amount of excess water travelling through the Avon valley.

My only chance of a wet hand.

 After around 4 hours of finding our way to the fishery we finally got to our port of call and tackled up with the excitement of what could happen on the next cast, but that excitement didn't last too long as the 35mph gusts took some of the shine off and the absolute lack of fish activity, for me it was a glum day with only a couple of baby Brown Trout caught and a take on a jig off of a sturdy looking Perch of maybe 2lb +, which disappointed a lot but it was the way that the day had gone, up at 5am, started fishing at noon and packed up by half four to catch our return train home which we missed. Summed it all up.

Salisbury Cathedral in the distance.

Almost unfishable, such a shame.

More than 3 foot up and pouring into the adjacent fields.


 It was all in all a disaster for me but Brian caught a small jack and Rich caught a jack of his own and a baby Grayling, although it was no longer than my index finger it was a Grayling, congrats although I would like one just a little bigger, needless to say I will go back and I will catch one, but not until this constant deluge ceases to batter us, my local Thames is still hammering through and in awful condition, it had been since around the 23rd of December, fishable by the end of the season I hope so but not holding my breath.

 I deserve a red letter day after that effort, fish gods are you listening. Until next time tight lines.

16 comments:

  1. The photo of us that says 'OK, it's a bit high but we're still going to have a great day"

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    1. I know, the day held so much promise but in the end was just too high and the old river, where we wanted to be was totally unaccessible, such a shame, it was more of a learning curve than anything else.

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  2. You didn't mention the "poaching"?.............!

    Not fished Britford before. I keep meaning to go every season. The Avon is a wild place when in flood. But it can become fishable again quite soon-ish if it stops raining. Though it's going to have a hell of flow to it until the end of the season.

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    1. A total misunderstanding, which we can not be at fault for, telephone number for the fisheries manager was not operational, the tackle shop I rang which is 4 miles away didn't have a scooby, plus the signage was insufficient and almost non-existent not to mention we had never been to the Salisbury Avon before, Poaching is quite a stern term and denotes the angler knowing full well that he was in the wrong, for which we didn't know, apologies for not knowing, we found the fishery in the end 4 hours after stepping off the train!, believe me we could have done without the wild goose-chase. James.

      Ps next time we know where to go, Cheers for Stuart and his advice, James.

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    2. I wasn't having a go. I just read about the session in the "Pike Blog", that's all. The signage for most fisheries is hopeless. I don't know whether they get stolen or vandalised or just that clubs don't bother. You haven't got a chance of knowing where you are on some venues. Some club waters are a nightmare when you haven't been to a venue before. My favourite is the old "park in the layby". There's no bloody layby. Or "drive through the gate". The gate is locked................ . "Use the punt to cross the river". The 'punt' is half sunk, has holes in and is padlocked to a tree............. etc etc

      Top marks for effort. At least you had some company. I've had those days when fishing alone. Not much fun.

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    3. Not to worry, I've had days that have looked just as dreary but I have done brilliantly so it was just the fish weren't playing ball, I've caught Barbel in 8-9ft of flood water, Roach over 2lbs in 5ft of excess tea brown flood water with them being my target, it's just luck of the draw and we couldn't get to them, but that's fishing if we caught our target every time we went fishing would it be as exciting?, It's refreshing to blank really, as it keeps on your toes and makes you think about where you went wrong and how you could have prepared better for the journey.

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  3. James/Brian,

    I wonder how many of us travel by public transport to get to our chosen venues?It takes some effort for sure.Odd looks from the non angling public,long yomps laden down with tackle.

    It's not easy for sure,well done gents for making the effort.An inter blog/public transport match should be in the offing.And Stewart the bailiff is a real gent.

    Ps Sorry I've backed Citeh to beat Chelsea 2-0 tonight,thus knocking you guys off the top.

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    1. It's weird but carrying a fishing rod on public transport always compels complete strangers to ask you if you're going fishing. I've offen wondered if people carrying golf clubs get asked if they're going to play golf... Or people carrying surfboards if they're going to do some giant ironing.

      Stewart and the locals were great, can't wait to get back down there and give it a proper go.

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    2. To venues like that and the Royalty, transport isn't a bad idea and it doesn't cost a lot either, just a shame the conditions were against us, it's against everyone though, I feel for the people who live there.

      I can't call the game though, man city will probably triumph, can't see mourinho's 11 wheel bus holding out too long...... A draw would be the best result.

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  4. Unlucky boys. Your baby brown trout looks like a salmon to me?

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    1. It is a salmon parr, it was me that misidentified it, easier to tell the difference from a photo than a fish flipping about. I meant to mention it earlier - sorry.

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    2. I honestly didn't think it was a Brownie, the tail is angled in, where a brownie tail is flat, but never caught a Salmon Parr before, so that's nice to see. We will get one Grayling at least before the season finishes.

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    3. I check the gill plate, one big spot = salmon, bunch of little ones = trout... about 95% of the time. The grayling are in the hands of the weather Gods...

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    4. Chest high waders next time and I will get to the old river and really try, all out assault, I will catch a Grayling........weather gods please, please, please play ball.

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  5. Grayling is my challenge this winter also.Was looking to get down the Itchen but flood conditions are making it difficult especially as I am new to the river. I will stick to stillwaters until the water receeds in search of that monster roach. Great read

    Tight lines

    www.thechoppedworm.blogspot.com

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  6. Cheers Daniel, it's so tough at the moment, but it's worth still heading out through the shite weather, good luck on the Grayling front, going to be hard.

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